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Sunday, August 28, 2016

Igbo Names That Reference God (Nigeria, West Africa)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post is part of an ongoing pancocojams series on African names and naming traditions.

This post provides a sample listing of Igbo names from Nigeria, West Africa that reference God. That compilation is preceded by brief notes about the Igbo language and an overview of traditional Igbo beliefs about God.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT IGBO LANGUAGE
From http://aboutworldlanguages.com/igbo
..."Igbo is one of the official languages of Nigeria. It is spoken in the Southern Delta states of Abia, Anambra, Ebonyi, Enugu, and Imo, as well as in the northeast of the Delta state and in the southeast of the Rivers state. In the states of Abia, Anambra, Ebonyi, Enugu, and Imo, Igbo is the main language of trade and commerce. It is used in mass media communication such as radio and television in the southern Delta region.

Although Igbo is taught at all levels in eastern Nigerian schools, English remains the principal literary language of the country while [Igbo] remains a spoken and colloquial language. Reading and writing in Igbo is not very widespread. In many urban areas, Igbo is often replaced by Nigerian Pidgin English. Igbo speakers are typically bilingual in English...

The sound inventory of Standard Igbo consists of eight vowels, thirty consonants, and two tones, depending somewhat on the analysis. Igbo has only two syllable types: consonant + vowel (the most common syllable type), vowel or syllabic nasal. There are no consonant clusters and no syllable-final consonants."...

****
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Igbo_language
"Igbo ... is the principal native language of the Igbo people, an ethnic group of southeastern Nigeria. There are approximately 24 million speakers, who live mostly in Nigeria and are primarily of Igbo descent. Igbo is written in the Latin script, which was introduced by British colonialists. There are over 20 Igbo dialects...
Igbo is also a recognised minority language of Equatorial Guinea....

Igbo is a tonal language with two distinctive tones, high and low....An example is ákwá "cry", àkwà "bed", àkwá "egg", and ákwà "cloth". As tone is not normally written, these all appear as ⟨akwa⟩ in print....

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INFORMATION ABOUT TRADITIONAL IGBO RELIGION
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chukwu
"Chukwu is the supreme being of the Igbo religion. In the Igbo pantheon, Chukwu is the source of all other Igbo deities, and is responsible for assigning them their different tasks. The Igbo people believe that all things come from Chukwu, who brings the rains necessary for plants to grow and controls everything on earth and the spiritual world. They believe Chukwu to be an infinitely powerful, undefinable, supreme deity encompassing everything in space and space itself.

Linguistic studies suggest that the name "Chukwu" or "Chukouuee" is a portmanteau of the Igbo words "Chi" ("spiritual being") and "Ukwu" ("great in size").[1]

Conception of Chukwu
According to the Igbo people from the south-eastern region of Nigeria, Chineke is the creator of the world and everything good in it along with rain, trees, and other plants. Chukwu is a supreme God represented by the sun. The ancient God is not humanized in Igbo tradition belief. Because the Igbo deities Amadioha and Ikenga are masculine, Chukwu is assumed to be male.

Many Igbo Christians refer to the Christian God as Chukwu as well.[2] The Igbo believe it is impossible for humans to conceive of the unlimited power of Chukwu. Many Igbo dialects refer to God by names such as "Chukwu", "Chiokike", or "Obasi."[3]."...

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LIST OF IGBO NAMES THAT REFER TO GOD
Pancocojams Editor Notes:
This list is culled from two sources- Part I: Names From Africa: Their Origin, Meaning, And Pronunciation by Ogonna Chuks-orji, edited and with a commentary by Keith E. Baird (Johnson Publishing Company, 1972) and Part II: http://www.behindthename.com/names/usage/igbo

**
A few of the names in Part I are also given in Part II.

**
Examples in Part I demonstrate how those Igbo names are pronounced, and, by extension, may provide some guidance regarding the pronunciation of the names given in Part II.

**
Notice that multiple names in this list begin or end with "chi" or "chukwu" or contain one of those elements in the middle. These elements refer to God.

**
This compilation doesn't claim to be a complete listing of Igbo names that refer to God. Additions to this list are welcome.

PART I
From Names From Africa: Their Origin, Meaning, And Pronunciation by Ogonna Chuks-orji, edited and with a commentary by Keith E. Baird (Johnson Publishing Company, 1972)

(Note: This book uses the outdated term "Ibo".)

Chinue (CHEEN-weh) God's own blessing, [female]

Chijoke (CHEE-jee-oh-keh), God gives talent, [male]

Chike (CHEE-keh), power of God [male]

Chinelo (CHEE-neh-loh), thought of God, [male]

Chinua (CHEE-no-ah), God's own blessing, [male]

Chioke (CHEE-oh-keh), gift of God, [male]

Chukwuweneka (choo-kwoo-eh-NEH-kah). God has dealt kindly with us, [male]*

Okechuku (oh-keh-CHOO-koo), God's gift, [male]

Onuwachi (oh-noo-WAH-chee), God's world, [male]

Onyebuchi (on-yeh-BOO-chee, (who is God), [male]

Onyemachi (on-yeh-MAH-chi), who knows God's will, [male]
-snip-
Here's an excerpt pertaining to one of these names from that book's commentary section:
"Africans are very religious; thus a family may through the name given to a child be saying that they consider the child's coming as a mark of divine favor, a blessing duly acknowledged in a boy's name such as Chukwueneka, "God has dealt kindly with us" (Ibo, Nigeria), or in the girls name Sibongile, which simply says "Thanks" (Ndebele, Zimbabwe)".

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PART II
From http://www.behindthename.com/names/usage/igbo

A, B
Akachi (the hand of God), male & female

Akuchi (wealth from God), male & female

Amarachi (God's grace), female

C, D
Chi (god, spiritual being" in Igbo, referring to the personal spiritual guardian that each person is believed to have. Christian Igbo people use it as a name for the personal Christian god. This can also be a short form of the many Igbo names that begin with this element)), male & female

Chiamaka (God is beautiful), female

Chibueze, (God is the king), male & female

Chibuike (God is strength), male & female

Chibuzo (God leads the way), male & female

Chichi (Diminutive of Igbo names beginning with the element Chi meaning "God"), female

Chidi (God exists; It is also a short form of Igbo names beginning with Chidi), male and female

Chidiebere (God is merciful), male & female

Chidiebube (God is glorious), male & female

Chidiegwu (God is wonderful), male & female

Chidike (God is strong), male

Chidimma (God is good), female

Chidubem (guided by God), male

Chiemeka (God has performed great deeds), male

Chijindum (God holds my life), male & female

Chika (God is the greatest), female

Chike (God's power), male & female

Chikelu (variant of Chikere)

Chikere (God created), male & female

Chima (God knows), male

Chinasa (God answers), female & male

Chinedu (God leads), male & female

Chinonso (God is nearby), male & female

Chinwe (God owns; It is also a short form of Igbo names beginning with Chinwe), male & female

Chinweike (God owns power), male & female

Chinwendu (God owns life), male & female

Chinweuba (God owns wealth), male & female

Chinyelu (variant of Chinyere), female

Chinyere (God gave), female

Chioma (good God), female & male

Chizoba (God protect us), male & female

Chuks (Diminutive of Igbo names beginning with the element Chukwu meaning "God"), male

Chukwudi (Variant of Chidi, using Chukwu as the first element, which is the extended form of Chi meaning "God"), male

Chukwuemeka (God has done something great), male

Chukwuma (Variant of Chima, using Chukwu as the first element, which is the extended form of Chi meaning "God"), male


E, F
Ekenedilichukwu (all praise to God), male & female

G, H

I, J

K, L

M, N
Nkechi (short form of Nkechinyere), female

Nkechinyere ("what God has given" or "gift of God"), female

O, P
Ogechi (Short form of Ogechukwukama), female

Ogechukwukama (God's time is the best), female

Oluchi (God's work), male & female

Onyeka (short form of Onyekachi), female & male

Onyekachi (who is greater than God?), famle & male

Onyekachukwu (Variant of Onyekachi, using Chukwu as the last element, which is the extended form of Chi meaning "God", male & female

Q, R

S, T

U, V
Uzochi (God's way), male

W, X, Y, Z

****
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Visitor comments are welcome.

Shona Names That Reference God (Zimbabwe, South Africa)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post is part of an ongoing pancocojams series on African names and naming traditions.

This post provides a sample listing of Shona language names from Zimbabwe, South Africa that reference God. That compilation is preceded by brief notes about the Shona language and an overview of traditional Shona beliefs about God.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SHONA LANGUAGE
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shona_language
Shona.... or chiShona, is a Bantu language, native to the Shona people of Zimbabwe. The term is also used to identify peoples who speak one of the Shona language dialects: Zezuru, Karanga, Manyika and Korekore, sometimes also Ndau. Some researchers include Kalanga: others recognise it as a language in its own right. Desmond Dale's basic English–Shona and Shona–English dictionaries comprise special vocabulary of the Karanga, Korekore, Manyika and Zezuru dialects, but no Ndau or Kalanga. Shona is a principal language of Zimbabwe, along with Ndebele and the official business language, English. Shona is spoken by a large percentage of the people in Zimbabwe. Other countries that host Shona language speakers include Botswana and Mozambique."

Shona is the Bantu language third most widely spoken as a native language after IsiZulu and Swahili, and the most frequent mother language. According to Ethnologue,[7] Shona, comprising the Karanga, Zezuru, and Korekore dialects, is spoken by about 10.8 million people. Manyika and Ndau dialects of Shona,[8][9][10] listed separately by Ethnologue,[11] and are spoken by 1,025,000[12] and 2,380,000[13] people, respectively. The total figure of Shona speakers is then about 14.2 million people. Zulu is the second most widely spoken Bantu language with 10.3 million speakers according to Ethnologue."....

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From http://wikitravel.org/en/Shona_phrasebook
"Shona has five vowels: a, e, i, o, u. If you are familiar with Spanish, Italian or Japanese, the vowels are pronounced the same. If not, they are pronounced:

A - ah (Like the "a" in "father")

E - eh (Like the "a" in "say" but without moving your mouth)

I - ee (Like the "ee" in "see")

O - oh (Like the "o" in "so" but without moving your mouth)

U - oo (Like the "oo" in "doom")

Vowels in Shona always make the same sounds, even when combined with other vowels. There are no silent letters or diphthongs in Shona, so vowels will always make the same sound, and it is important that you pronounce each vowel, even when one vowel follows another. For example, in the word "kuudza" (to tell), you must say "koo-oo-dza", pronouncing both of the u's. Simply saying "koo-dza" (kudza) changes the meaning to "raise/respect"."...
-sni-
I added italics to highlight that portion of that sentence.

****
From http://zimbabwe-names.blogspot.com/2013/01/Zimbabwean-Shona-Names.html
Friday, January 18, 2013
Zimbabwean Shona Names
"These are some of the most common names in the native Shona language of Zimbabwe, [qhich is spoken by over 80% of the population. I wrote these names from my head because I know friends and people with such names.I can speak and write the common Karanga Shona version fairly well,although deep Shona can be a challenge. Shona has five dialects (Karanga, Zezuru, Manyika, Ndau and Kore Kore)....

Pronunciation
If you can pronounce Spanish, Japanese and Italian words, then you will find it easy to pronounce Shona words because the languages have similar vowel pronounciations. Spanish is one of the easiest languages to learn in the world...

Shona has some interesting sounds which might be hard to pronounce for somebody who did not grow up in the social setting. These include whistled sounds, deep clapping sounds,click sounds and snapping sounds among others."...
.
-snip-
This post only features names from that website which refer to God.

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TRADITIONAL SHONA BELIEFS ABOUT GOD
From http://www.postcolonialweb.org/zimbabwe/religion/arntsen1.html
Shona and Ndebele Religions by Hilde Arntsen, Lecturer, Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo
"In Shona and Ndebele religions, God, or the Supreme Being, is seen as the creator and sustainer of the universe in much the same manner as within Christianity. Shona Mwari (literally "He who is"), or Ndebele uMlimu are both believed to be active in the everyday lives of people, and even in politics...

In general, people communicate with Mwari through the vadzimu (Shona), or amadhlozi (Ndebele). These are the deceased ancestors. The vadzimu are believed to constitute an invisible community within the community of the living, always around their descendants, caring for them and participating in their joys and sorrows (Moyo, 1988: 199). Spirit mediums communicate with the vadzimu on behalf of the people.

Communication between the living and the dead is taken care of by the spirit mediums who are vital parts of Shona culture and religion. The role of the spirit mediums and their communication with and appeasement of the ancestors were considered by many, missionaries and colonialists in particular, to be ancestor worship. However, the spirit mediums were instead acting as intermediaries between Mwari/uMlimu and the living, carrying messages, prayers and thanks from the human being to God. Where ancestors are subject to appeasement by human beings, it is believed that God is appeased as well. It must be noted, however, that it is not the ancestors themselves, the vadzimu, who are worshipped, but rather God through them. In the words of one of my sources, the sprit mediums "intercede between you and the ancestral spirits. The ancestral spirits will intercede who will carry it forward to God, because we also believe in God."....

****
LIST OF SHONA NAMES THAT REFER TO GOD
Notes:
This list of names is compiled from the following websites: http://zimbabwe-names.blogspot.com/2013/01/Zimbabwean-Shona-Names.html, and http://www.behindthename.com/submit/names/usage/shona.

I rewrote the entries from that online source using the first source's format. In cases where these sources give somewhat different meanings for these names, I've presented the zimbabwe-names blog's meaning first and the behind the names blog's meaning second. However, in some cases, the behind the names blog includes entries with both meanings of a name.

Notice that multiple names in this list end with "aishe" or "ashe". According to Google translate, "aishe" means "Lord".

This compilation doesn't claim to be a complete listing of Shona names that refer to God. Additions to this list are welcome.

A, B
Anaishe (who is with God) female + male
(Derived from Anashe)

C, D

E, F

G, H

I, J
Ipaishe (give to God) female

K, L
Kudakwashe (the Lord's will) male

Kudakwashe (will of God) male + female

Kunashe (God is there) female

M, N
Makatendeka (you are faithful [to God]) male + female

Mukudzei (praise God) female

Munashe (God with us) female + male

Munesu (God is with us or God is within us) female + male

Mutsawashe (God’s mercy) female

Mutsawashe (Kindness of God or The Lord is Kind) female

Ngonidzashe (God’s mercy) male + female

Nokutenda (with gratitude [associated with faith in God]) male + female

Nyashe (merciful) female

Nyashadzashe (God's grace) male + female

O, P
Panashe (where there is God) female

Q, R
Ropafadzo (blessing from God) female

Rudorwashe (God’s love) female

Ruvarashe (God’s flower) female

Ruvarashe (the Lord's flower) female

S, T
Simbarashe (God’s power) male

Tadiwanashe (God loves us) female + male

Tadiwanashe (God loves us) male

Tadiwanashe (God is proud of us) male + female

Tadiraishe (Those who answered God's call/agreed or believed in God's word) male + female
(Anglicized, Rare)

Tapiwanashe (given by God) female

Tinaye (we are with God) female + male

Timukudzei (praise Him – God) female

Tinashe (God with us) male

Tinopiwanashe (we are given by God) female

Tinozivaishe (we know God) female + male

U, V
Vimbainashe (Abide with God) female

Vimbainashe (have faith in God) female

W, X, Y, Z
Zvinodaishe (what God wants) female + male

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Friday, August 26, 2016

The REAL Meaning Of "Bad To The Bone" In George Thorogood & The Destroyers' Song

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post presents information about the (White) British group George Thorogood and the Destroyers' 1982 Blues rock song "Bad To The Bone" along with lyrics for and a video of that song.

This post also presents my critiques of online definitions of the term "bad to the bone" means in the context of this record and my statement about what "bad to the bone" REALLY means in this song and why it has that meaning.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, etymological, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners

Thanks to George Thorogood and the Destroyers for their musical legacy. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

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INFORMATION ABOUT GEORGE THOROGOOD & THE DESTROYERS' RECORD "BAD TO THE BONE"
http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=11616 [referred to below as songfacts. com #1]
Album: Bad to the Bone
Released: 1982
This is based on the Bo Diddley Blues song "I'm A Man." Thorogood is influenced by The Blues, and Diddley is one of his heroes... Both songs are full of swagger, with the singers exuding lots of testosterone...

With MTV coming on the air in 1981, Thorogood picked a good time to release a memorable video. The clip showed Thorogood playing pool against Bo Diddley in a place where there was no chance of a dance sequence breaking out. Pool champion Willie Mosconi also appears in the video, which introduced Thorogood - and to some extent, Diddley - to the younger MTV crowd."...

***
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bad_to_the_Bone
"Bad to the Bone" is a song by George Thorogood and the Destroyers released in 1982 on the album of the same name. While it was not widely popular during its initial release, its video made recurrent appearances on the nascent MTV, created a year before. Licensing for films, television, and commercials has since made the song more popular.

Structure and influences
The song's roots can be traced back to rock and roll musician Bo Diddley's song "I'm a Man", which uses a similar guitar riff and vocal rhythm, and has a similar overall structure, as well as Willie Dixon's "Hoochie Coochie Man", Muddy Waters's "Mannish Boy," John Lee Hooker's "I'm Bad Like Jesse James", and Johnny "Guitar" Watson's "Gangster of Love". The riff is also very similar to the one from Chuck Berry's song "No Money Down" as well as Elvis Presley's "Trouble"."

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SONG LYRICS: BAD TO THE BONE
(As sung by George Thorogood and the Destroyers)

On the day I was born
The nurses all gathered 'round
And they gazed in wide wonder
At the joy they had found
The head nurse spoke up
Said "leave this one alone"
She could tell right away
That I was bad to the bone

Bad to the bone
Bad to the bone
B-B-B-B-Bad
B-B-B-B-Bad
B-B-B-B-Bad
Bad to the bone

I broke a thousand hearts
Before I met you
I'll break a thousand more, baby
Before I am through
I wanna be yours pretty baby
Yours and yours alone
I'm here to tell ya honey
That I'm bad to the bone
Bad to the bone
B-B-B-Bad
B-B-B-Bad
B-B-B-Bad
Bad to the bone

I make a rich woman beg
I'll make a good woman steal
I'll make an old woman blush
And make a young girl squeal
I wanna be yours pretty baby
Yours and yours alone
I'm here to tell ya honey
That I'm bad to the bone
B-B-B-B-Bad
B-B-B-B-Bad
B-B-B-B-Bad
Bad to the bone

And when I walk the streets
Kings and Queens step aside
Every woman I meet
They all stay satisfied
I wanna tell ya pretty baby
Well Ya see I make my own
I'm here to tell ya honey
That I'm bad to the bone
Bad to the bone
B-B-B-B-Bad
B-B-B-Bad
B-B-B-Bad
Bad to the bone

Source: http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/georgethorogoodandthedestroyers/badtothebone.html

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SHOWCASE VIDEO: George Thorogood And The Destroyers - Bad To The Bone



emimusic, Uploaded on Apr 22, 2010
-snip-
Selected comments from this video's discussion thread:
2015
Craig Jackson
"good song ROCK N ROLL forever

**
Reply
"+Craig Jackson Led Zeppelin and George are the best White boy bluesmen ever....no offense to Eric Clapton."

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2016
Freddy Ramirez
"Anybody besides me ever thought this was sung by a black guy? I had no idea, always loved this song!"

**
Reply
stephen brooks
"+Freddy Ramirez You're dumb lol"

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Freddy Ramirez
"+stephen brooks don't tell me you never thought about it lol"

**
Reply
duttyow709
"+Freddy Ramirez Muddy Waters, Mannish Boy."

**
connfyoozed
"For those who don't know, this is a cover of a Bo Diddley song. That is Bo Diddley playing pool against George in the video. And Bo Diddley was one bad mofo with a guitar."

****
THE REAL MEANING OF "BAD TO THE BONE" IN THE CONTEXT OF GEORGE THOROGOOD & THE DESTROYERS' RECORD
In the context of George Thorogood & The Destroyers' "Bad To The Bone" song, a man who is "bad to the bones" is "thoroughly good when it comes to pleasing women sexually". A man who is "bad to the bone" has really "got it goin' on" when it comes his success with women.

"Bad to the bone" is an intensification of the standard English language meaning of the word "bad". Instead of something negative, in African American slang, the adjective "bad" means "very good". The adjectives "dope" and "sick" are two other contemporary [beginning of the 21st century?] African American originated synonyms of "bad".

Read the other definitions of "bad to the bone" below that I found online. I don't think the definitions of "evil through and through" fit the sexually bragging lyrics of those Blues, Blues Rock, and R&B songs that I mentioned.
-snip-
It should be noted that "the bone" that is referenced in the term means "skeleton bones" and not the slang term for a man's sexual organ.

**
It's ironical that George Thorogood's last name echos the real meaning of the term "bad to the bone".

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OTHER ONLINE DEFINITIONS OF "BAD TO THE BONE"
From http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=11616
"The phrase "Bad To The Bone" means there isn't a bit of good in him....

While Thorogood is a disciple of the Blues, he was raised in a Delaware suburb and by most accounts is actually a pretty nice guy, despite what he claims in this song"...
-snip-
The songfact.com writer arrived at those conclusions even though he or she wrote that "George Thorogood & The Destroyers' "Bad To The Bone" is "based on the Bo Diddley Blues song "I'm A Man."

Another songfacts.com article about Bo Diddley's "I'm A Man" song (http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=12395; songfacts.com #2) indicates that "He sings about his sexual prowess".
-end of quote.
"I'm A Man", "Hoochie Coochie Man", "Mannish Boy", the British Blues Rock song "Bad To The Bone", and countless other Blues & R&B songs are self-bragging songs. And what the men are bragging about is their sexual prowess with women.

People who read the lyrics of those songs and concludes that a man who describes himself as "bad to the bone" is using the standard definitions of "bad" rather than the African American Vernacular English meaning which is coupled with the slang definition of "to the bone", meaning "thoroughly". Add a large amount of sexual inferences and you arrive at what I strongly feel is the REAL meaning of "bad to the bone" in the context of George Thorogood & The Destroyers' song*.
-snip-
*I added italics to highlight the end of that sentence.

****
From https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bad_to_the_bone
"Adjective
bad to the bone ‎(not comparable)
(idiomatic) Completely bad and evil; pure evil."

**
From http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bad+to+the+bone
“bad to the bone".- idiom
Thoroughly and completely immoral, wicked, dangerous, and/or unlawful. Often used in an ironic, jocular way.

****
OTHER USES OF THE PHRASE "___ TO THE BONE"
Barbecue Bob's 1928 song "Chocolate To The Bone" is an example of an early use of "___ to the bone" phrase. In that song, the singer brags about how I "Love that I’m brownskin, chocolate to the bone." Although the extended form of this phrase isn't used in that song, "chocolate to the bones" means "chocolate down to my bones". While that 1928 song includes a considerable amount of sexual bragging, the "chocolate to the bone" phrase refers to the person being proud that he/she* is part of the brownskin (i.e. Black) race.

*I wrote he/she because it appears to me that although the singer is a man, the person whose words are spoken in that 1928 song is a woman.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/12/barbecue-bob-chocolate-to-bone-sound.html for a pancocojams post about that song.

****
"She's My One Black Two Black" is the title/first line of a children's rhyme/song which includes the words "chocolate to the bone". I believe that Barbecue Bob's 1928 song is the primary source of "One Black Two Black". I also believe that the phrase "chocolate to the bone" in that song means the same thing that it does in that earlier song -i.e. the person who is "chocolate to the bone" is proud of her or his Black racial identity.

****
"Trini to the bone" [Trinidadian] to the bone" is a contemporary Caribbean form of the phrase "chocolate to the bone". That patriotic phrase affirms one's love of being from Trinidad (or from Trinidad & Tobago). The use of the colloquial referent "Trini" marks this form of that phrase as being of somewhat recent origin. That phrase may have been used prior to David Ruffin's 2003 Soca song "Trini to de bone". However, that song certainly popularized that phrase. Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VCYlLG8VR8 for a sound file of that Soca song.

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Video Examples Of Kappa Kappa Psi, National Honorary Band Fraternity Stepping & Strolling

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post provides information about Kappa Kappa Psi. This post also showcases five videos of the stepping and strolling performance styles of a few of that organization's Black chapters or predominately Black chapters.

Another featured video showcases an example of members of Kappa Kappa Psi singing their national hymn and the last featured videos shows members of Kappa Kappa Psi serenading a member's bride and then stepping at the wedding reception.

The content of this post is presented for cultural and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all others who are featured in these videos and thanks to the publishers of these YouTube videos.

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INFORMATION ABOUT KAPPA KAPPA PSI
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Kappa_Kappa_Psi_chapters
"Kappa Kappa Psi (ΚΚΨ), National Honorary Band Fraternity. Over 300 chapters have been established in the United States since 1919, which are organized into six separate districts."

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kappa_Kappa_Psi
Kappa Kappa Psi, National Honorary Band Fraternity (ΚΚΨ, colloquially referred to as KKPsi), is a fraternity for college and university band members in the United States. It was founded on November 27, 1919 at Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, now known as Oklahoma State University, in Stillwater, Oklahoma.
Kappa Kappa Psi primarily operates as a recognition society[1] providing service, leadership opportunities, and social programming for band members. Tau Beta Sigma, National Honorary Band Sorority, has been recognized as a sister organization since 1947, and the two organizations share National Headquarters in Stillwater Station, a converted historical Santa Fe rail depot that was purchased by the fraternity and sorority in 1991.

Since 1919, more than 66,000 men and women have been initiated into Kappa Kappa Psi, with nearly 6,000 collegiate members active today. Members of Kappa Kappa Psi include President Bill Clinton; astronaut Neil Armstrong;[4] chancellor and eleventh president of Indiana University, Herman B Wells;[5] composers John Williams and John Philip Sousa;[6] conductor William Revelli; and jazz pianist and bandleader Count Basie.[7]

…May 1957 saw the first chapters at historically black universities: On May 19, the Delta Alpha chapter at Langston University was installed; three days later, the Gamma Omega chapter was established at Texas Southern University.[19]

... The first women to join the fraternity were sisters of the Sigma chapter of Tau Beta Sigma at Arizona State University, who merged with the Beta Omicron chapter of Kappa Kappa Psi after a unanimous vote of both organizations.[23] These women were Patricia A. Childress, Lydia L. Lennon, Leslie A. Anderson, Mary L. Duffala, Mary M. Ketterer, Kristina M. Zipsnis, Clara M. Bertilson, and Toni Ryon, who were initiated into Beta Omicron on August 26, 1977.[23] On August 27, Lea F. Fuller was initiated.[23] The first woman to participate in the formal probationary membership process and become a member of Kappa Kappa Psi was Darragh Hill Young, who was initiated into the Beta Tau chapter at Wichita State University on September 1, 1977.[23]....

The Fraternity Hymn was written by brother Scott Jeffrey Heckstall Jr. when he was a prospective member of the Eta Gamma chapter in 1977.[68] Heckstall had wanted to be a charter member, but was not chosen. Heckstall was encouraged to rush, and he recalled that as part of his rush process, a couple of brothers took him to a piano and told him, "We know that you play [piano] in church. We need a fraternity hymn. We'll give you three hours, and you sit over there and come up with a hymn. We'll come back in three hours, and we expect a hymn."[68] Heckstall recalled the hymn Someday (Beams of Heaven As I Go) by Charles Albert Tindley and changed a few words—for example, "Beams of Heaven as I go through this wilderness below" became "K K Psi, as we go through this wilderness here below."[68] The brothers of Eta Gamma were satisfied with Heckstall's hymn.
Years later, the hymn was presented to the brotherhood assembled at the 1995 National Convention and accepted as the national fraternity hymn.[69] Blue and white are the fraternity's official colors.[67] The fraternity flower is a red carnation, so chosen because it was founder William Scroggs's favorite flower.[67]"...
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A performance of Kappa Kappa Psi's fraternity hymn is found in the video given below as Example #3.

While Kappa Kappa Psi isn't a historically Black Greek letter fraternity, I've included the "Black fraternity and sorority stepping" tag below because Kappa Kappa Psi's stepping (hopping), strolling, probate shows, and other organization features are similar to those historically Black organizations, although they also add their own signature moves such as "loose neckin'" and "skate" to stepping & strolling traditions.

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS

Example #1: Kappa Kappa Psi - Zeta Psi hopping at Homecoming



James Drake Uploaded on Nov 9, 2010

The brothers of the Zeta Psi chapter of Kappa Kappa Psi, National Honorary Band Fraternity, Inc. party hopping during the Homecoming drumline tunnel at Virginia State University

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Example #2: Kappa Kappa Psi



ktg778 Uploaded on Apr 8, 2011

Kappa Kappa Psi strolling at Valdosta State University. Lambda Omicron chapter April 8, 2011

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Example #3: KKPsi Hymn



Ahandful ofIdiots Published on Apr 25, 2012
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The hand holding style that is used for this song is the same as way singers join hands while singing the civil rights song "We Shall Overcome". I've also found other YouTube videos of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., a Black Greek letter sorority using the same hand holding style while singing their Sweetheart song.

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Example #4: 2012 UMD Block Show: Kappa Kappa Psi



Shegaw Mekonen Published on May 7, 2012

The brothers of Kappa Kappa Psi band fraternity's Gamma Xi chapter perform at the 2012 University of Maryland Block Show

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Example #5: Rowden Wedding Bruhs Sangin Delta Psi Chapter Hymn



Marcus Rowden Published on Mar 27, 2013

Bruhs Sangin, Looseneckin and Steppin at my wedding.
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Click https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQVQKe-2Lfc for another video of that fraternity serenading and stepping. That video identified the fraternity as Kappa Kappa Psi (Prairie View A&M University). Here's the summary of that video: "Marcus and the Brothers of Kappa Kappa Psi (PV) serenade Mrs. Rowden! Then they get a loose neck and hump back!"

"Sangin[g]" is a African American Vernacular English present tense form of the word "sing". That definition of "sang" means "to sing very well, especially to sing soulfully very well".
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Example #6: NC A&T KAPPA KAPPA PSI at the 2015 Honda Battle of the bands Social



DMCash Published on Jan 31, 2015

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Example #7:. Kappa Kappa Psi, Zeta Phi Chapter 2016 Bowl N Stroll



Stefan Smith Published on Jan 31, 2016

All 3 rounds of the Tuskegee University chapter of Kappa Kappa Psi winning performance at the 2016 Bowl N Stroll in Atlanta, Ga

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RELATED VIDEO
Click https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UK0Ptuyxymo
for a video example of a Kappa Kappa Psi probate (a show introducing new members of that organization to the public.) Notice how much that probate is like those performed by historically Black Greek letter organizations.

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