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Friday, September 22, 2017

Comments That Refer To "Nambia", "Zamunda", "Wakanda", & Other Fictional Nations Which Were Prompted By Trump's Mispronunciation Of An African Nation's Name

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post documents various mostly lighthearted comments and tweets that were written in response to one of United States President Trump's gaffes* during a September 2017 United Nations luncheon with leaders of several African nations.

The content of this post is presented for cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

*I found another comment that Trump made at that same luncheon -that "I've so many friends going to your countries trying to get rich, I congratulate you." - to be far more serious and disturbing than the probably mispronunciation of an African nation's name. Click https://www.cnbc.com/2017/09/20/trump-congratulates-african-leaders-for-making-his-friends-rich.html for an article about that statement.

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE "NAMBIA" GAFFE TRUMP MADE DURING THE AFRICAN LEADERS LUNCHEON
From http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/trump-mispronounces-namibia-luncheon-african-leaders-article-1.3509832
"President Trump mispronounced the name of a southern African country in a meeting with African leaders in New York City Wednesday.

“In Guinea and Nigeria you fought a horrifying Ebola outbreak,” Trump said at the luncheon during the U.N. General Assembly. “Nambia’s health system is increasingly sufficient.”

The country’s name is Namibia. A White House pool report said the President was referring to Namibia."...

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From http://people.com/politics/donald-trump-nambia-gaffe/ "Donald Trump Refers to the Nonexistent Country of Nambia and the Tweets Are Practically Writing Themselves" by Kathy Ehrich, posted on September 20, 2017
"President Donald Trump mistakenly referred to the African nation of Namibia as Nambia in a speech on Wednesday — and social media users were quick to pounce on the gaffe.

“Nambia’s health system is increasingly self-sufficient,” Trump said at a working luncheon with African leaders. Earlier, he can also be heard mistakenly referring to “Nambia” in his opening remarks.

The White House later clarified in an official transcript that the president was referring to Namibia, a country in southwest Africa, according to The Hill.

Even so, Twitter users were quick to hone in on the error, making jokes and teasing the president for making yet another blunder.

[...]

Trump has often been criticized for his gaffes and misspellings, including time he tweeted the nonsense word “covfefe.”

One Twitter user hearkened back to that much-mocked error, joking that “Covfefe is the unofficial beverage of Nambia.”
-snip-
Why did Trump try to praise "Namibia's health system? Here's some information about that Southern African nation's health system:
From http://www.nhp.com.na/about-us/
"Namibia Health Plan (NHP) was established in 1995 to provide a world class, uniquely Namibian medical aid plan to help cover medical costs.

Since then, NHP has grown rapidly to become one of the largest medical aid funds in our country, providing for the healthcare needs of more than 54,000 beneficiaries. We are also the first choice for Namibians as shown by the results of the PMR Africa surveys where NHP was presented with the Diamond Arrow award for excellence in the medical aid industry in Namibia for six consecutive years (2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015). NHP was also nominated the most efficient medical aid fund by healthcare providers in 2014."...

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SOME OF THE FICTIONAL NATIONS MENTIONED IN THESE COMMENTS
(given in alphabetical order)

NAMBIA - a fictional African nation referred to by Trump was probably a mispronunciation of the name of the Southern African nation of "Namibia". The names of the African nations of "Gambia" and "Zambia" also sound like the word "Nambia".

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NARNIA
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chronicles_of_Narnia
"The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of seven fantasy novels by C. S. Lewis. It is considered a classic of children's literature and is the author's best-known work, having sold over 100 million copies in 47 languages.[1][2] Written by Lewis, illustrated by Pauline Baynes, and originally published in London between 1950 and 1956, The Chronicles of Narnia has been adapted several times, complete or in part, for radio, television, the stage, and film.
Set in the fictional realm of Narnia, a fantasy world of magic, mythical beasts, and talking animals, the series narrates the adventures of various children who play central roles in the unfolding history of that world."...

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WAKANDA
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wakanda_(comics)
"Wakanda is a fictional nation appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics.[1] It is the most prominent of several fictional Bantu African nations in the Marvel Universe, and it is home to the superhero Black Panther. Wakanda first appeared in Fantastic Four #52 (July 1966), and was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.[2]

Location
Wakanda is located in Northeastern Africa, although its exact location has varied throughout the nation's publication history: some sources place Wakanda in East Africa, just north of Tanzania,[3] while others - such as Marvel Atlas #2 - show it bordering Lake Turkana, near Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia (and surrounded by fictional countries like Azania, Canaan, and Narobia). In the Captain America: Civil War movie, Wakanda was shown on a map at the northern end of Lake Turkhana, at a fictional point bordering Ethiopia, Sudan, Uganda, and Kenya.

History
The Wakandan royal line began with Bashenga, an ancient Wakandan whose first and only appearance was in Black Panther vol. 1 #7 (Jan 1978). Bashenga was supposedly the first king of unified Wakanda, and the first Black Panther some 10,000 years ago.[4]
In the distant past, a massive meteorite made up of the sound-absorbing mineral vibranium crashed in Wakanda, and is unearthed a generation before the events of the present-day. T'Challa, the current Black Panther, is the son of T'Chaka, the Black Panther before him and a descendant of Bashenga. Knowing that others would attempt to manipulate and dominate Wakanda for this rare and valuable resource, T'Chaka conceals his country from the outside world. He sells off minute amounts of the valuable vibranium while surreptitiously sending the country's best scholars to study abroad, consequently turning Wakanda into one of the world's most technologically advanced nations. Eventually, however, the explorer Ulysses Klaw finds his way to Wakanda, and covers up his work on a vibranium-powered, sound-based weapon. When exposed, Klaw kills T'Chaka, only to see his "sound blaster" turned on him by a grieving teenaged T'Challa. Klaw's right hand is destroyed, and he and his men flee.[4]"...

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WESTEROS
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_of_Thrones
"Game of Thrones is an American fantasy drama television series created by David Benioff and D. B. Weiss. It is an adaptation of A Song of Ice and Fire, George R. R. Martin's series of fantasy novels, the first of which is A Game of Thrones. It is filmed in Belfast and elsewhere in the United Kingdom, Canada, Croatia, Iceland, Malta, Morocco, Spain, and the United States. The series premiered on HBO in the United States on April 17, 2011, and its seventh season ended on August 27, 2017. The series will conclude with its eighth season in 2018 or 2019.[1]

Set on the fictional continents of Westeros and Essos, Game of Thrones has several plot lines and a large ensemble cast but centers on three primary story arcs."
-snip-
Click https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_of_A_Song_of_Ice_and_Fire for more information about "Westeros:.

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ZAMUNDA- The fictional African nation featured in the 1988 American movie Coming To America.
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coming_to_America
"Coming to America is a 1988 American romantic comedy film directed by John Landis, and based on a story originally created by Eddie Murphy, who also starred in the lead role. The film also co-stars Arsenio Hall, James Earl Jones, Shari Headley and John Amos. The film was released in the United States on June 29, 1988. Eddie Murphy plays Akeem Joffer, the crown prince of the fictional African nation of Zamunda, who comes to the United States in the hopes of finding a woman he can marry. The film spawned a brief U.S. television spin-off series."
-snip-
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/02/the-origins-meanings-of-jaffe-joffer.html for the 2014 pancocojams post entitled "The Origins & Meanings Of "Jaffe Joffer" & Other Names From "Coming To America" (with videos)".

Also, click http://madamenoire.com/188391/bet-you-didnt-know-secrets-behind-the-making-of-coming-to-america/3/ for other suppositions about the source/s of the name "Zamunda".

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OTHER GAFFES THAT ARE MENTIONED IN SOME OF THESE COMMENTS
TWO CORINTHIANS
From http://www.npr.org/2016/01/18/463528847/citing-two-corinthians-trump-struggles-to-make-the-sale-to-evangelicals "Citing 'Two Corinthians,' Trump Struggles To Make The Sale To Evangelicals", January 18, 2016
...There were a few stumbles during Donald Trump's sojourn to Liberty University on Monday.

He mispronounced a book of the Bible. He cursed — twice. And on Martin Luther King Day, the GOP presidential candidate said he was honoring the slain civil-rights leader by dedicating to him the record crowds he says he drew for the school's opening convocation. (Students are required to attend.)

"We're going to protect Christianity. I can say that. I don't have to be politically correct," he thundered at the beginning of his speech at the conservative evangelical university.

Then he moved on to cite "Two Corinthians 3:17, that's the whole ballgame. ... Is that the one you like?" Trump asked. "Now the Lord is that Spirit: and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty."

That's a verse that's etched on campus buildings, but that verse comes from "Second Corinthians" — not "Two."

Students in the room snickered and laughed, and advisers to two of Trump's top rivals, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, were quick to point out the gaffe on Twitter."...

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"COVFEFE"
A number of people mentioned the word "covfefe" in their tweets or comments about Trump's "Nambia" gaffe.
Here's information about "covfefe:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Trump_on_social_media#.22Covfefe.22
"On May 31, 2017, Trump sent out a tweet that read, in its entirety, "Despite the constant negative press covfefe". The tweet was deleted only hours after its posting.[62] It immediately went viral, becoming an Internet meme and a source of widespread jokes.[63] The tweet was liked and retweeted over a hundred thousand times, making it one of the most popular tweets of 2017 to that date, as people speculated on the meaning of the word "covfefe".[64] About five hours later, Trump deleted it and sent out another one, asking people what they thought "covfefe" could mean".

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FREDERICK DOUGLASS
A few of the comments that were written in response to this latest gaffe [i.e. mispronouncing the name of an African nation at a luncheon with African leaders] also referred to Trump's referring to 19th century African American orator and activist Frederick Douglass as though he were still living: on February 1, 2017: In a televised speech honoring Black History Month, United States President Trump described Frederick Douglass as "someone who has done a terrific job that is being recognized by more and more people, I notice".
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/02/the-self-resurrection-of-frederick.html for a Part III of a three part pancocojams series about Frederick Douglass. Part III includes examples from a twitter page that is supposedly hosted by a "resurrected" Frederick Douglass.

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THE BOWLING GREEN MASSACRE
Some commenters also mentioned the gaffe that Trump's spokesperson Kelly Anne Conway made about a massacre in Bowling Green which never happened - "The Bowling Green massacre is a fictitious incident alluded to by U.S. Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway in interviews with Cosmopolitan and TMZ on January 29, 2017, and in an interview on the MSNBC news program Hardball with Chris Matthews on February 2, 2017. Conway cited it as justification for a travel and immigration ban from seven Muslim-majority countries enacted by United States President Donald Trump. However, no such massacre occurred"... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowling_Green_massacre

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SELECTED COMMENTS ABOUT TRUMP'S NAMBIA GAFFE
From http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/trump-hosts-african-leaders-un-nambia_us_59c2b29fe4b0c90504fb0cfe?ncid=inblnkushpmg00000009 Trump To African Leaders: My Friends Go To Your Countries To Get Rich He also praised Africa’s non-existent nation of Nambia, By Jesselyn Cook, 9/20/2017 [Selected comments]
1. Fred Arcala
"We should try it improve our relations with Zamunda...they’re like super rich and would be a great place for one of president the Donald’s golf courses or towers."

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2. Skam XChapman
"Prince Akeem Joffer is the longest serving African leader."

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3. Brian Board
"How is his wife doing? She moved pretty far to be with him."

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4. Heather Mazza
"Open up a McDowell's"

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5. Heather Mazza
"Start a new Soul Glo line"

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6. Sigrid Coulthurst ·
"I'm sure Wakanda would be a better option."

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7. Peter Oelbaum ·
"ladies and gentlemen give it up for Sexual Chocolate."

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8. Linge Ndabambi ·
"I think it's actually south of Zemunda landlocked by Pandora."

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9. Rhiannon Mills ·
"Take a left at the wardrobe, pass Narnia, and first stop on the right is Nambia, where covfefe grows wild."

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10. Suzanne Whitney
"Surely Trump knows that the finest healthcare in the entire world is in Munchkinland! Who doesn't know this?"

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11. Will Roane ·
"I certainly hope he opens trade with Wakanda. Just think of the benefits of the Vibranium rights alone!"

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12. Cindy Godet
"He'll be reading the awesome Bible book of 2 Corinthians while visiting Nambia and drinking a nice hot cup of Covfefe!"

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13. Brenda Garrett ·
"I wouldn't be surprised if he doubled down and says there really is a place. The capitol city is Covfefe."

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14. Gerry Huffpo
"Nambia must be when thry speak Covfefe...."

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15. Stuart Tarleton ·
"Namibia is south of Angola on the south west coast of Africa. Nambia is it's small more affluent brother and it is close to Nevernever land."

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16. David Acheson ·
"And it's just south of Mordor."

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17. Everett Vann Eberhardt ·
"Bordered by Zemunda, whose King, James Earl Jones, and Crown Prince, Eddie Murphy, missed his big U.N. speech."

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18. Daniel Villa ·
"I was waiting for him to make a reference to Tarzan and Jane for letting him stay with them while he's there.."

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19. Ken D. Blackwell ·
"Could be worse. He could’ve referenced Wakanda."

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20. Juskin Mitchell
"Don't give him ideas. He might invade them to get the vibranium."

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21. Greg Weiner ·
"Yeah and Wakanda has great resources of Vibranium dude. Check it out. Totally real."

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22. Wade Lance ·
"Two Corinthians walk into a bar in Nambia…"

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23. Christian Hinrichs ·
"Is the capital of Nambia not Bowling Green?

#BowlingGreenMassacre
#neverremember
#Nambia
#vivaNambia
#Covfefe"

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24. Brian Lesyk ·
"According to Two Corinthians, Nambia was an ancient country which bordered Covfefe."

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25. Tricia Lynn
"At least he didn't say Zamunda....."

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26. Dustin Narcisse ·
"I saw Nambia on the Game of Thrones map during the opening credits"

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27. Meryl Vincenzo ·
"Nambia is where they grow corfefe."

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28. Oleg Slivnyak ·
"I remember that not long ago Nambia was at war with Covfefe. Well, look at both of them now..."

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29. David Earl Williams III ·
"He enjoys having his covefefe in Nambia 😂"

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30. Rick Darrington ·
"I think he probably meant “Narnia!”😉😂"

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31. Dana Brewer Harris
"Frederick Douglass is in Nambia right now."

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32. Cecelia Thomas ·
"He probably just wants to meet the Prince of Zamunda!"

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33. Marty Grifka
"Then he can go get covfefe at wakanda and watch the pink panther premiere"

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34. Camille Dickinson
"That's where all those emails from African Princes come from...."

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35. Lee Reed
"The covfefe mines in Nambia?"

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36. Sanjeev Madhav
"Wait! He forgot to mention Westeros! Yuge mistake!!! Complete covfefe!"

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SELECTED TWEETS ABOUT TRUMP'S NAMBIA GAFFE
From https://twitter.com/hashtag/nambia?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Ehashtag
1.
Julie Lynn‏ @bellafortunate Sep 20
Nambia, the world's top producer of covfefe.

#PrayForNambia #nambia

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2.
Tony Groeblinghoff‏ @groeblbubble Sep 20
Was #Nambia responsible for the #Bowlinggreen massacre? We may never #Covfefe

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3.
Rainbow Doom‏ @RobinCook Sep 20
Frederick Douglass was ambassador to Nambia. This has been brought to you by Alternative Facts Theater.

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4.
Jillian Leyba‏ @jillianfuqua Sep 20
Replying to @groeblbubble @JoyAnnReid
I think #Nambia is also where Frederick Douglass is living these days.

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5.
Tony Groeblinghoff‏ @groeblbubble Sep 20
Many people don't know this but Obama is from Nambia as well.

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6.
Tony Groeblinghoff‏ @groeblbubble Sep 20
That would explain why no Nambians were at the YUGE inauguration ceremony for Trump.

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7.
YS‏ @NYinLA2121 Sep 20
You guys shouldn’t make fun of Nambia.

Without Nambia, we would not have any covfeve.

#Nambia

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8.
bad Trini‏ @LSAT62 Sep 20
Thank God he didn't have to say "Niger". #Nambia

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9.
Tony Posnanski‏Verified account @tonyposnanski Sep 20
Say what you want but #Nambia makes the best damn cup of Covfefe this side of Bowling Green.

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10.
TheRealManface‏ @Mr_Manface Sep 22
Things to do in #Nambia
1. Find it
-snip-
Here are two more tweets that were written in response to Trump's Nambia gaffe:
From http://people.com/politics/donald-trump-nambia-gaffe/ Donald Trump Refers to the Nonexistent Country of Nambia and the Tweets Are Practically Writing Themselves; by Kathy Ehrich, September 29, 2017
.
((((JoshuaWarren)))) @JoshWarrun
Footage of the Prince of #Nambia leaving the @UN after meeting with @realDonaldTrump. // @KagroX @dailykos
2:43 PM - Sep 20, 2017
-snip-
This tweet included a gif of "Prince Akeem" from a clip of the 1988 Coming To America movie.

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Benjamin Siemon ✔@BenjaminJS
Nambia doesn't exist and already has better health care than we're about to get from Republicans.
3:01 PM - Sep 20, 2017

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Videos Of The Caribbean Nation Of Dominica In 2017 Before And After Hurricane Maria

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post features selected videos made in 2017 of the Caribbean nation of Dominica before and after Hurricane Maria.

The content of this post is presented as a means of documenting the rich culture of Dominica and encouraging visitors to this blog to help support post hurricane recovery for this nation and for other Caribbean nations that were also devastated by this in Hurricane Maria and Hurricane Irma.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Our thoughts and prayers are with the Caribbean and others who have experienced or will experience the wrath of Hurricane Maria.
-snip-
Click for an article about Hurricane Maria and the Caribbean: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/puerto-rico-hurricane-maria_us_59c180b1e4b087fdf508d7c3?ncid=inblnkushpmg00000009
"Most Devastating Storm In Puerto Rico’s Modern History Leaves Entire Island Without Power: The U.S. territory is still dealing with the consequences from Hurricane Irma.
By Lydia O’Connor, 9/20/2017

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SELECTED 2017 VIDEOS OF DOMINICA- PRE-HURRICANE MARIA
Example #1: Roseau - Newtown - Eggleston (Dominica)


Péter Pénzel Published on Jan 23, 2017
-snip-
Roseau is the capital of Dominica with a population of 15,000.

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Example #2: Dominica Carnival Opening 2017



Entertainment NOW Published on Feb 6, 2017

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Example #3: Mardi Gras 2017, Grand Bay, Dominica



Ras Mo Moses Published on Feb 28, 2017

This video is about traditional drumming & sennsé masquerade costumes in the village of Grand Bay on Carnival Tuesday 2017 in the island Dominica.

These costumes are rooted in African tradition and were banned after tragic fire in the 60's but were revived in more recent times.

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Example #5: Roseau, Dominica 2017



Joop Terpstra Published on Mar 17, 2017

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SELECTED 2017 VIDEOS OF DOMINICA- POST-HURRICANE MARIA
Example #1: Roseau before and after Hurricane Maria in Dominica, floods, surge, winds, damage,



Cities of the World, Published on Sep 20, 2017

Roseau before and after Hurricane Maria in Dominica, floods, surge, winds, damage,
Hurricane Maria, enormous damage in Dominica ,floods and collapsed houses in RoseauDominica[edit]
Rainfall ahead of the hurricane caused several landslides in Dominica as water levels across the island began to rise by the afternoon of September 18.[23] At 21:35 ATS that day (1:35 UTC, September 19), the core of Maria moved directly over Dominica with wind speeds of 160 mph (260 km/h), or Category 5 intensity. The extreme winds blew the roofs off many houses, including the official residence of Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit, who required rescue when his home began to flood.[24] Reports from Roseau indicate "total devastation," with half the village flooded, cars stranded, and stretches of residential area "flattened".[25][26] Most of the island was left without cellular, radio, or internet service. Skerrit called the devastation "mind boggling" and indicated immediate priority was to rescue survivors rather than assess damage.[27] As of September 19, according to an update from the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA), there have been 6 deaths on Dominica as a result of the hurricane, based on preliminary information.[21]

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Example #2: Hurricane Maria pounds Dominica



The Star Online, Published on Sep 19, 2017

Hurricane Maria, the second major storm to hit the Caribbean this month, crept towards the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico on Tuesday after it ripped through the small island nation of Dominica. The fierce storm has been classified as fierce Category 5 hurricane.

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Prince Hall Shriners' Tradition Of "Riding" (Marching In Procession While Doing The Camel Walk Dance)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents information about the Prince Hall Shriners' tradition of "riding" (i.e. marching in procession while doing the dance called the "Camel Walk".)

This post also showcases two processional videos of the Shriners' female auxiliary "The Daughters Of Isis".

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all the Prince Hall Shriners and the Daughters Of Isis who are featured in this post. Thanks also to those who wrote the information that I quoted in this post and thanks to the producers of these videos and to their YouTube publishers.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/09/videos-of-camel-walk-dance-shriners.html for the closely related pancocojams post "Videos Of "The Camel Walk" Dance & Shriners "Riding" Camel Walk Strut"
-snip-
DISCLAIMER:
I have no affiliation with the Shriners' female auxiliary "The Daughters of Isis". Nor do I have any direct or indirect contact with any member of the A.E.A.O.N.M.S. (Shriners).

As indicated above, this information is posted for folkloric, cultural, and aesthetic purposes. I've also re-published this post as a means of pointing out the very close similarities between Shriners' "riding" with historically Black Greek lettered fraternities' and sororities' strolling. Pancocojams video examples of "strolling" can be found by clicking the African American fraternities and sororities tag.
-snip-
Much of this pancocojams post was previously published in 2013 on my zumalayah cultural blog*.

Zumalayah showcases videos of dances & singing games done in circles or in lines, and other movement performance arts from African American culture, from African cultures, and from other cultures of the African Diaspora.

I no longer add content to Zumalayah or any other of my Google blogs except pancocojams. To access zumalyah, click http://zumalayah.blogspot.com. The hyperlinks for my other google blogs "cocojams 2 [posts about children's recreational rhymes & singing games] and civil rights songs can be found on the right hand sidebar.

I've also added the Black church processional tag at the bottom of this post because of the similarities between Shriners' riding processionals and Black church processionals. Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/11/marching-for-jesus-church-ushers-nurses.html Marching For Jesus (Church Ushers & Nurses) Black Church Processions Part III for one of my favorite posts about Black church processionals, particularly the first showcase video about processionals during a convention of church ushers and nurses.

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE PRINCE HALL SHRINERS
The formal name for the Prince Hall Shriners is the "Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine". (A.E.A.O.N.M.S.) This Black fraternal organization are called "Prince Hall Shriners" to distinguish them from the earlier organization of Shriners who are White.

Prince Hall (1735 – 1807) was an African American noted as a tireless abolitionist, for his leadership in the free black community in Boston, and as the founder of Prince Hall Masonry (in 1775). (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Hall)

The Prince Hall Shriners were founded in 1893.

"The Camel Walk" has been at least informally adopted as a signature group march of the Prince Hall Shriners. That fraternal organization's adoption of the "Camel Walk" for their processionals is likely because the "camel" is connected with the Shriners' and their female auxiliary's (the Daughters of Isis) Middle Eastern theme. As part of that Middle Eastern theme, the members of the Prince Hall Shriners are called "Nobles" & they wear tasseled fezes during their special events. The Prince Hall Shriners' chapters are called "temples" & the terms "oasis" is used for the city and "desert" is used for the state that a specific temple (for instance, Arabia Temple #12, Black Stone Disciples, Oasis of Portsmouth Desert Of Virginia.)

The Prince Hall Shriners’ performance of the Camel Walk dance is called "riding" . A version of the song "Ride The White Horse" appears to be the (at least unofficial) anthem of the Prince Hall Masons' riding.

Click http://www.aeaonms.org/about.htm and http://www.sinai59.org/DomainHistory.htm for information about the Shriners.

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FEATURED VIDEOS
(These videos are presented in chronological order based on the date of their YouTube posting, with the oldest dated videos posted first.)

Warning: The "Ride The White Horse" record that appears to be routinely used for the Shriners' "riding" custom contains the repeated word "b**tch". Although this blog usually doesn't feature any videos that contains profanity, I'm including these videos in the interest of documenting the Prince Hall Shriners tradition of "riding".

Example #1: Shriners- Chicago Camel Walk 2010



palestinenoble1, Uploaded on Oct 5, 2010

Chicago-Palestine #1 A.A.O.N.M.S. First Gala Walk in 26yrs...Bringing it back home.

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Example #2: Ahmed Temple #37



Uploaded by Princess314 on Oct 10, 2010
-snip-
The audience calls in this video such as "I see you [person's name]!", "Alright now!", and "Get it now!" remind me of the responses that are heard at Black Greek lettered step shows and stroll competitions.

Also, one or more person dancing in the center of the circle is a traditional form of African American dances & other African Diaspora dances. That same formation in which a person/persons in the center of the circle format is found in Black children's circle games.

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Example #3: Persian Temple No. 46 - 2010 Potentate Ball - Intro (Camel Walk)



Uploaded by smokeyjoesii on Dec 19, 2010
-snip-
This video also points out some striking similarities between the "riding" processional movement of the Prince Hall Shriners and the "strolling" processional movement of historically Black Greek lettered fraternities and sororitites.

The Prince Hall Shriners were founded in 1893 and Alpha Phi Alpha, Inc (the first university based historically Black Greek lettered organization) was founded in 1906. Therefore, it would be correct to say that those historically Black Greek lettered fraternities are modeled after the Prince Hall Shriners and not vice versa.

Another way in which these organizations resemble each other is their use of call & response chanting. I can't make out what the leader says in the above video, but the response is "46" (the number of this particular Shriners' "chapter").Compare that to Black Greek lettered fraternities'/sororities' signature chants which include call & response chants that are based on the organization's founding date. For instance, members of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. have a call & response chant in which the leader of the chanters calls "1 9" and the other chanters respond "0 6" - 1906 being the date that the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity was founded.

I'd love to know if it's common for Prince Hall Shriners & Daughters of Isis to pledge any BGLO fraternity or sorority, and if so, I wonder if one particular fraternity or sorority is most often pledged by those men and those women.

By the way, the women in the video who are dressed in white with white hats are members of the Prince Hall Shriners' female auxiliary, the Daughters of Isis.

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Example #4: Golconda Temple No. 24 Nobles camel walking into the formal dinner dance



Uploaded by bks2295 on Mar 7, 2011

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Example #5: NOBLES

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MrMyPushUps, Uploaded on Mar 18, 2011

ARABIA TEMPLE#12
BLACK STONE DISCIPLES
OASIS OF PORTSMOUTH DESERT OF VA
Party At The Shriners
Deep South Shriners-PHA (A.E.A.O.N.M.S)

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Example #6: Jerusalem Temple #4 - A.E.A.O.N.M.S. Baltimore Md



Rosco Production, Published on Jul 25, 2012

Jerusalem Temple #4 - A.E.A.O.N.M.S.
New Class Of 2012 Nobles

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Example #7: Shriners - Camel Walks, Parades, Balls, Fez, entertainment



Selim Etkar, Published on Jan 10, 2017

Best of Shriner's videos from youtube.
-snip-
At around 9:22 in this video, notice the "Soul Train" line formation (and earlier, the Virginia Reel formation) of two individuals dancing down a center isle formed by people standing facing each other in two parallel lines.

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ADDENDUM
Example #1: 2010 NY Drill Team -Julia Grand Court Daughters of Isis and Mecca Syria # 7 Temple Nobles



tyboogie758, Published on Feb 28, 2011

Watch the Daughters of Isis and Nobles from NYS win the Annual Drill team competition at the 17th Annual Convention in St. Louis, MO.

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Example #2: 2017 Tuwa Joint Ball ( Tuwa Court)



RayDog2K4, Published on May 9, 2017

2017 Tuwa Joint Ball

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Monday, September 18, 2017

1984 Article Excerpt About Robert Farris Harris, An American Historian & Writer Specializing In African & African Diaspora Folk Cultures

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides an excerpt of a 1984 Rolling Stone magazine article about Robert Farris Thompson entitled "Robert Farris Thompson: Canons of the Cool". Robert Farris Thompson is a White American historian and writer specialising in the art and cultures of Africa and African Diaspora Folk Cultures.*

An excerpt from the Wikipedia page for Robert Farris Thompson is given in the beginning of this post.

The content of this post is presented for linguistic, cultural, and educational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Robert Farris Thompson for his life's legacy and thanks to the author of the article that is being quoted.

Note: I publish excerpts of articles or of hard to find books in this pancocojams blog to increase awareness about those writings and to encourage people to read them in their entirety.

*Most of this sentence identifying Robert Farris Thompson is taken from his Wikipedia page. However, I added the words "and cultures" to that sentence. I also changed the term "Afro-Atlantic" that is given in that Wikipedia page to "African Diaspora Folk Cultures" as that term is a better fit for me in describing the range and depth of Thompson's interest and scholarly accomplishments.

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INFORMATION ABOUT ROBERT FARRIS THOMPSON
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Farris_Thompson
"Robert Farris Thompson (born December 30, 1932, El Paso, Texas[1]) is an American historian and writer specialising in the art of Africa and the Afro-Atlantic world. He has been a member of the faculty at Yale University since 1965 and currently serves as the Colonel John Trumbull Professor of the History of Art.[2] Thompson coined the term "black Atlantic" in his 1983 book Flash of the Spirit: African and Afro-American Art and Philosophy - the expanded subject of Paul Gilroy's book The Black Atlantic.[3]

He lived in the Yoruba region of southwest Nigeria for many years while he conducted his research of Yoruba arts history. He is affiliated with the University of Ibadan and frequented Yoruba village communities. Thompson has studied the African arts of the diaspora in the United States, Cuba, Haiti, Puerto Rico, and several Caribbean islands...

Career at Yale
In 1955, Thompson received his B.A. from Yale University. After receiving his bachelor's degree, he continued his studies at Yale, where he received his Masters in 1961 and his Ph.D in 1965.[4]

Having served as Master of Timothy Dwight College from 1978 until 2010, he was the longest serving master of a residential college at Yale. Thompson is one of America's most prominent scholars of African art, and has presided over exhibitions of African art at the National Gallery in Washington D. C.. He is one of the longest-serving alumni of Yale.

Publications and areas of study
Beginning with an article on Afro-Cuban dance and music (published in 1958), Thompson has dedicated his life to the study of art history of the Afro-Atlantic world.[4] His first book was Black Gods and Kings, which was a close reading of the art history of the Yoruba people of southwestern Nigeria (population of approximately 40 million).[4] Other published works include- African Art in Motion, Flash of the Spirit (1983), Face of the Gods, and Tango: The Art History of Love.[4] Thompson also published an introduction to the diaries of Keith Haring. Some of his works have even been translated into German, Portuguese, French and Flemish.[4] Additionally, Thompson also studies the art of Guillermo Kuitca and José Bedia, and has been anthologized 15 times.[4]”...

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ARTICLE EXCERPT:
From http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/features/canons-of-the-cool-19841122
"Robert Farris Thompson: Canons of the Cool"

The Yale professor was destined to become another stuffy intellectual — until he danced the mambo

By Fred Iseman, November 22, 1984
..."Robert Farris Thompson and I have come down to Haiti on a 10:30 a.m. flight from New York to pass the weekend with André Pierre and with Madame Nerva, a vodun priestess. Thompson is an art historian, a tenured professor at Yale and master of Timothy Dwight College there. I am a former student of his, come along to watch Bob make what he calls "a little sounding" — "a little sondage." André Pierre is the Haitian Fra Angelico, a vodun cleric whose canvases hang in the Haitian national museum; copies of his work fill airport postcard racks.

[...]

White of skin, white of hair and white of origins, education and society, Robert Farris Thompson fell in love with black music, black art and blackness 30 years ago and has spent his entire career in the grips of that particular passion. Following an instinct aroused by a mambo overheard in 1950, Thompson has learned fluent Ki-Kongo, Yoruba, French, Spanish and Portuguese and is learning a score of Creole and tribal languages; wandered, with pygmies, Zaire's Ituri forest; become a vodun acolyte; written four books on West African religion, philosophy and art; and organized two major exhibitions at Washington's National Gallery. He has also become, by dancing in an indigo costume embroidered with seashells taken from the gizzards of dead crocodiles, a "junior-varsity member of the Basinjon Society," a Cameroun tribal agency for controlling lightning and other natural forces.

Incorporating anthropology, sociology, ethnomusicology and what Thompson calls "guerrilla scholarship" (i.e., "We'll let the fud-duds footnote their way across that"), Thompson's career is bent toward a single end: the learned advocacy of black Atlantic civilization. He spends his life pursuing the scholarly thrill of making coherent and meaningful what is misunderstood as random, superficial or obscure. As an art historian will extract from basilica floor plans a comprehension of the medieval mind, or from late Roman statuary an understanding of the empire's decline, Thompson works from the iconography of salsa, dance steps, clothes, sculpture, gesture and slang to a definition of blackness. He loves to show how sophisticated the "primitive" really is. As archeologist, he brings artifacts to life; as critic, he deciphers them; and as true believer, he promotes their artistic and spiritual worth.

[...]

Bob Thompson lectures his class like a fundamentalist preacher rousing a congregation, knees bent, microphone cocked and wire trailing behind him. He walks amid the 200 students overflowing the Street Hall auditorium out into the corridor. Thompson's fall course, HoA 379a, is titled "The Structure of the New York Mambo: Microcosm of Black Creativity." Onstage a tape player emits pygmy yodeling; from the vacant lectern hangs a map of West African tribal dominions; and on the screen flash slides of Harlem, pygmies, fabrics of syncopated patterns and Kongo-influenced funerary sculpture from North Carolina graveyards. "Why," Thompson asks, "are black people so sassy?"

The answer begins with the etymology of the phrase "get down." It moves to the Yoruba concepts of cool (itutu) and command (àshe); lateral versus sagittal walking; the aesthetics of drumming; the significance of offbeat phrasing; call-and-response; and finally Muhammad Ali. Thompson's voice switches to a mock-Groton lilt to declaim a litany of African influences:

"A lot of our slang was created by people thinking in Yoruba and Ki-Kongo while speaking in English. The basic sounds of agreement and disagreement, uh-huh and unh-unh, are pure West African. Funky is Ki-Kongo lu-fuki, 'positive sweat.' Boogie comes from Ki-Kongo mbugi, meaning 'devilishly good.' Jazz and jisn probably derive from the same Ki-Kongo root dinza, meaning 'to ejaculate.' Mojo comes from Ki-Kongo for 'soul'; juke as in jukebox from Mande-kan for 'bad'; and Babalu-Aye — as in disc jockey Babalu — is pure and simple Yoruba for 'Father and Master of the Universe.'

"Most of our ballroom dancing is Africanized," he continues, "the rhumba, the tango, even tap-dancing and the Lindy. Fried chicken is African. And J. Press patchwork shorts may be related to an African fabric. Even cheerleading incorporates some apparent Kongo gestures: left hand on hip, right hand raised twirling a baton. It worked its way up through New Orleans Vodun Rara bands into the Dallas Cowboys' half-time show."

"Let me give you all the pieces that ignited," Thompson explains, sitting in a campus restaurant. "I grew up in Texas; I was crazy about boogie. I wasn't a football player or anything, and I realize now that any elements of attractiveness I had for girls then were both musical and black-influenced. My senior year at prep school, I went to Mexico City on a trip. There was this mambo — Mexico City was awash in mambo — I heard waiters humming it, I heard it on the lips of gas-station attendants, I heard it in the background when talking to the hotel operator on the phone. It was my first full shot of African music: all-out black polyphony, mambo multimetrics. A stunning woman stopped in front of me in a cafe; she heard this music, and I heard her say to her companion, 'But darling, it's such a different beat.'"

Thompson's newest book, Flash of the Spirit, explains the roots of African influence in the New World. It serves as a sort of Baedeker to funk. One reviewer wrote, "This book does for art history what the dunk shot did for basketball."

"Let me give you all the pieces that ignited," Thompson explains, sitting in a campus restaurant. "I grew up in Texas; I was crazy about boogie. I wasn't a football player or anything, and I realize now that any elements of attractiveness I had for girls then were both musical and black-influenced. My senior year at prep school, I went to Mexico City on a trip. There was this mambo — Mexico City was awash in mambo — I heard waiters humming it, I heard it on the lips of gas-station attendants, I heard it in the background when talking to the hotel operator on the phone. It was my first full shot of African music: all-out black polyphony, mambo multimetrics. A stunning woman stopped in front of me in a cafe; she heard this music, and I heard her say to her companion, 'But darling, it's such a different beat.'"

A mambo called "The Newspaper Shirt Mambo" — La Camisa de Papel — by Justi Barretto, is the principal icon of Thompson's career. A broken shard of the Mexican 78-rpm record as sung by Perez Prado hangs framed in his study. "Specifically, it's about a black who wears a shirt literally made of scare headlines — a shirt of newspaper. The song had no fear of strong subject matter — it was about the beginning of the Korean War and about the fear of thermonuclear war. One line goes, 'Hey, black man, got the news?' I was irradiated with this music, hopelessly hooked on mambo."

[...]

"Music called," Thompson says, "and art history was the response." He decided to become a graduate student at Yale. "The more I studied, the more I saw how the world had covered up the source of all this. It wasn't Latin music — it was Kongo-Cuban-Brazilian music. You can hear Kongo rhythms in 'The Newspaper Shirt.' And mambu in Ki-Kongo means 'issues, important matters, text.' A mambo is a seminar on the crisscross of currents from Africa.

"These are some of the strands in the textile: salsa and reggae share the mambo impulse, and the mambo component in turn emerged from Cuba in the late 1930s. Yoruba is still spoken there. If you were Yoruba, and taken in slavery in the nineteenth century, chances were you'd wind up in Cuba or northeastern Brazil. Afro-Cuban culture survived slavery. Those Afro-Cuban rhythms are hot, acrid and bumping. I have spent my life like a literary critic," he says, "trying to marshal all the apposite texts to decode 'The Newspaper Shirt Mambo.'"

[...]

In the process of getting tenure at Yale, Thompson published Black Gods and Kings, The Four Moments of the Sun and African Art in Motion, about the intertwining aesthetics of West African sculpture, fabric and dance. Now Flash of the Spirit is reaching readers who aren't specialists, iconographers or academics. His next book, finally, after 30 years, will be the mambo book.

"Each successive wave of immigration — Dominican, Puerto Rican, Haitian, Jamaican — enhances the music. One can speak of 'conjugating' a beat. It's explosive. Salsa was a major turning point — in 1968 New York became virtually the musical capital of the Latin world. And all of it cross-pollinating with jazz, and pure Yoruba music like King Sunny Ade, and then, through secondary reverberations, to white groups, like the Talking Heads.

[...]

Thompson is keen to distinguish between practicing West African religion and teaching the culture of which it is a part. Recently, someone he hardly knows asked him for spiritual advice, and Thompson was appalled. He thinks of himself as a medium, but a medium of the most ordinary sort. He feels that what he has to teach is merely what he's culled from all his global "informants." In Thompson's books, the acknowledgment sections tend to run to hundreds and hundreds of tiny little sonorous names, which if read aloud sound like listings from the Lagos, Rio, Ouagadougou and New Haven telephone directories combined. They are the sources of the "flash of the spirit," without which, Thompson says, he's "just Joe the gray-haired academic."

[...]

Those who slight the importance of such black folk rituals, and of Thompson's life's work, make him indignant. "How dare people patronize Africa?" he asks. "Those people stand like giants in teaching us how to live. There is a moral voice imbedded in the Afro-Atlantic aesthetic that the West can't grasp. They don't see the monuments, just barefoot philosophy coming from village elders. But the monument is a grand reconciling art form that tries to morally reconstruct a person without humiliating him." Sometimes when Thompson starts rolling, his voice takes on the cadences of black speech.

"These are the canons of the cool: There is no crisis that cannot be weighed and solved; nothing can be achieved through hysteria or cowardice; you must wear and show off your ability to achieve social reconciliation. Step back from the nightmare. It is a call for parlance, for congress and for self-confidence. 'The Newspaper Shirt' is all about wearing a crisis on your chest. Afro-Atlantic art forms are juridical and medical, as well as aesthetic. It is a very hard-nosed way to use art."...

-snip-
Click https://detroitisafrotopia.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/flash-of-the-spirit-african-and-afro-american-art-and-philosophy.pdf for a pdf file of "Flash Of The Spirit: African and Afro-American Art And Philosophy by Robert Farris Thompson

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